exact

Definitions:

  • Strictly and completely in accord with fact; not deviating from truth or reality.
  • Characterized by accurate measurements or inferences with small margins of error; not approximate.
  • Characterized by strict adherence to standards or rules.
  • To force the payment or yielding of; extort.
  • To inflict (vengeance or punishment, for example).
  • To force or compel to be paid or yielded; demand or require authoritatively or menacingly.
  • To demand of right or necessity; enjoin with pressing urgency.
  • To claim; require.
  • <strong>Synonyms</strong> <em>Exact, Extort, Enforce. Extort</em> is much stronger than <em>exact</em>, and implies more of physical compulsion applied or threatened. <em>Exact</em> and <em>extort</em> apply to something to be got; <em>enforce</em> to something to be done. <em>Enforce</em> expresses more physical and less moral compulsion than <em>extort.</em>
  • To practise exaction.
  • In <em>English law</em>, to call (a party) in court to answer.
  • Closely correct or regular; strictly accurate; truly adjusted, adapted, conformable, or the like.
  • Precisely correct or right; real; actual; veritable: as, the <em>exact</em> sum or amount; the <em>exact</em> time; those were his <em>exact</em> words. A statement is <em>exact</em> which does not differ from the true by any quantity, however small. See synonyms under <em>accurate.</em>
  • Methodical; careful; not negligent; observing strict accuracy, method, rule, or order: as, a man <em>exact</em> in keeping appointments; an <em>exact</em> thinker.
  • Characterized by or admitting of exactness or precision; precisely thought out or stated; dealing with definite facts or precise principles: as, an <em>exact</em> demonstration; the <em>exact</em> sciences.
  • Steady; even; well-balanced.
  • To demand or require authoritatively or peremptorily, as a right; to enforce the payment of, or a yielding of; to compel to yield or to furnish; hence, to wrest, as a fee or reward when none is due; -- followed by <ex>from</ex> or <ex>of</ex> before the one subjected to exaction.
  • Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect; true; correct; precise
  • Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual
  • Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; strict.
  • To practice exaction.
  • Precisely agreeing with a <xref>standard</xref>, a <xref>fact</xref>, or the <xref>truth</xref>; perfectly <xref>conforming</xref>; neither <xref>exceeding</xref> nor <xref>falling</xref> <xref>short</xref> in any respect.
  • Habitually <xref>careful</xref> to agree with a standard, a <xref>rule</xref>, or a <xref>promise</xref>; accurate; <xref>methodical</xref>; <xref>punctual</xref>
  • Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; <xref>strict</xref>.
  • Such that the <xref>kernel</xref> of one homomorphism is the <xref>image</xref> of the preceding one.
  • To demand and <xref>enforce</xref> the <xref>payment</xref> or <xref>performance</xref> of.
  • To make <xref>desirable</xref> or necessary.
  • To forcibly <xref>obtain</xref> or <xref>produce</xref>.
  • take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs
  • (of ideas, images, representations, expressions) characterized by perfect conformity to fact or truth ; strictly correct
  • claim as due or just
  • marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact
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