exchange

Definitions:

  • To give in return for something received; trade.
  • To give and receive reciprocally; interchange.
  • To give up for a substitute.
  • To turn in for replacement.
  • To give something in return for something received; make an exchange.
  • To be received in exchange.
  • The act or an instance of exchanging.
  • One that is exchanged.
  • A place or network for exchanging things, especially a center where securities or commodities are bought and sold.
  • A telephone exchange.
  • None
  • A system of payments using instruments, such as negotiable drafts, instead of money.
  • The fee or percentage charged for participating in such a system of payment.
  • A bill of exchange.
  • A rate of exchange.
  • The amount of difference in the actual value of two or more currencies or between values of the same currency at two or more places.
  • A dialogue.
  • Of or relating to a reciprocal arrangement between a local and a foreign institution or group.
  • To go, by exchange with another officer, from one regiment or branch of service to another.
  • In <em>com.</em>, to part with in return for some equivalent; transfer for a recompense; barter: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exchange">exchange</internalXref> goods in foreign countries for their native productions; the workman <em>exchanges</em> his labor for money.
  • To give and receive reciprocally; give and take; communicate mutually; interchange: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exchange">exchange</internalXref> horses, clothes, thoughts, civilities.
  • To quit or part with for something else; give up in substitution; make a change or transition from: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exchange">exchange</internalXref> a crown for a cowl; to <em>exchange</em> a throne for a cell or a hermitage; to <em>exchange</em> a life of ease for a life of toil.
  • <strong>Synonyms</strong> To change, trade, truck, swap, bandy, commute. See the noun.
  • To make an exchange; pass or be taken as an equivalent: as, how much will a sovereign <em>exchange</em> for in American money?
  • A mutual transfer of two officers in different regiments or branches of the service.
  • In <em>chess</em>, the advantage of having a rook against the opponent's knight or bishop.
  • The giving of one thing or commodity for another; the act of parting with something in return for an equivalent; traffic by interchange of commodities; barter.
  • The act of giving up or resigning one thing or state for another: as, the <em>exchange</em> of a crown for a cloister.
  • The act of giving and receiving reciprocally; mutual transfer: as, an <em>exchange</em> of thoughts or of civilities.
  • Mutual substitution; return: used chiefly in the phrase <em>in exchange.</em>
  • That which is given in return for something received, or received in return for what is given.
  • Hence Among journalists, a newspaper or other regular publication sent in exchange for another.
  • In <em>law</em>: A reciprocal transfer of property for property, as distinguished from a transfer for a money consideration.
  • At common law, more specifically, a reciprocal or mutual grant of equal interests in land, the one in consideration of the other, as a grant of a fee simple in return for a fee simple.
  • In <em>com.</em>: The giving or receiving of the money of one country or region in return for an equivalent sum in that of another, or the giving or receiving of a sum of money in one place for a bill ordering the payment of an equivalent sum in another.
  • The method or system by which debits and credits in different places are settled without the actual transference of the money—documents, usually called <internalXref urlencoded="bills%20of%20exchange">bills of exchange</internalXref>, representing values, being given and received.
  • The rate at which the documentary transfer of funds can be made; the course or rate of exchange: as, if the debts reciprocally due by two places be equal, the <em>exchange</em> will be at par; but when greater in one than in the other, the <em>exchange</em> will be against that place which has the larger remittances to make, and in favor of the other. Abbreviated <em>exch.</em>
  • A place where the merchants, brokers, and bankers of a city in general, or those of a particular class, meet at certain hours daily to transact business with one another by purchase and sale.
  • The central station where the lines from all the subscribers in any telephone system meet, and where connections can be made between the lines.
  • In <em>arithmetic</em>, a rule for finding how much of the money of one country is equivalent to a given sum of the money of another.
  • A statute of 1878 (41 Vict., c. 13) which declared signature a sufficient acceptance.
  • A statute of 1882 (45 and 46 Vict., c. 61) which codifies the whole body of English law relating to bills, notes, and checks.
  • The act of giving or taking one thing in return for another which is regarded as an equivalent.
  • The act of substituting one thing in the place of another; ; also, the act of giving and receiving reciprocally.
  • The thing given or received in return; esp., a publication exchanged for another.
  • The process of setting accounts or debts between parties residing at a distance from each other, without the intervention of money, by exchanging orders or drafts, called <ex>bills of exchange</ex>. These may be drawn in one country and payable in another, in which case they are called <ex>foreign bills</ex>; or they may be drawn and made payable in the same country, in which case they are called <ex>inland bills</ex>. The term <ex>bill of exchange</ex> is often abbreviated into <ex>exchange</ex>.
  • A mutual grant of equal interests, the one in consideration of the other. Estates exchanged must be equal in quantity, as fee simple for fee simple.
  • The place where the merchants, brokers, and bankers of a city meet at certain hours, to transact business; also, the institution which sets regulations and maintains the physical facilities of such a place. In this sense the word was at one time often contracted to <altname>'change</altname>
  • See under <er>Arbitration</er>.
  • See under <er>Bill</er>.
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