exercise

Definitions:

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  • Activity that requires physical or mental exertion, especially when performed to develop or maintain fitness.
  • A specific activity performed to develop or maintain fitness or a skill.
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  • The active use or application of something.
  • The discharge of a duty, function, or office.
  • An activity having a specified aspect.
  • A military maneuver or training activity.
  • A ceremony that includes speeches, presentations, and other activities.
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  • To subject to practice or exertion in order to train, strengthen, or develop.
  • To put through exercises: <i>synonym</i>: <strong> practice</strong>.
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  • To make active use of; employ, apply, or exert.
  • To discharge (duties, for example).
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  • To carry out the functions of.
  • To execute the terms of (a stock option, for example).
  • To alarm, worry, or anger; upset.
  • To engage in exercise.
  • To put in practice; carry out in action; perform the functions or duties of: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exercise">exercise</internalXref> authority or power; to <em>exercise</em> an office.
  • To put in action; employ actively; set or keep in a state of activity; make use of in act or procedure: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exercise">exercise</internalXref> the body, the voice, etc.; to <em>exercise</em> the reason or judgment; <em>exercise</em> your skill in this work.
  • To train or discipline by means of exertion or practice; put or keep in practice; make, or cause to make, specific trials: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exercise">exercise</internalXref> one's self in music; to <em>exercise</em> troops.
  • To give mental occupation or exercise to; cause to think earnestly or anxiously; make uneasy: as, he is <em>exercised</em> about his spiritual state.
  • To impart as an effect; put forth as a result or consequence; communicate; exert.
  • <strong>Synonyms</strong> To apply.
  • To drill.
  • To try, afflict, pain, annoy.
  • To use action or exertion; exert one's self; take exercise: as, to <internalXref urlencoded="exercise">exercise</internalXref> for health or amusement.
  • To conduct a religious exercise, as the exposition of Scripture.
  • A carrying on or out in action; active performance or fulfilment; a physical or mental doing or practising: used of the continued performance of the functions, or observance of the requirements, of the subject of the action: as, the <em>exercise</em> of an art, a trade, or an office; the <em>exercise</em> of religion, of patience, etc.
  • Voluntary action of the body or mind; exertion of any faculty; practice in the employment of the physical or mental powers: used absolutely, or with reference to the reflex effect of the action upon the actor: as, to take <em>exercise</em> in the open air; corporeal or spiritual <em>exercise</em>; violent, hurtful, pleasurable, or healthful <em>exercise.</em>
  • A specific mode or employment of activity; an exertion of one or more of the physical or mental powers; practice in the use of a faculty or the faculties, as for the attainment of skill or facility, the accomplishment of a purpose, or the like: as, an <em>exercise</em> in horsemanship; <em>exercises</em> of the memory; outdoor <em>exercises.</em>
  • A disciplinary task or formulary; something done or to be done for the attainment of proficiency or skill; a set or prescribed performance for improvement, or an example or study for improving practice: as, school <em>exercises</em>; an <em>exercise</em> in composition or music; <em>exercises</em> for the piano or violin.
  • A performance or procedure in general; a definite or formal act for a purpose; specifically, a feature or part of a program or round of proceedings: as, the <em>exercises</em> of a college commencement, or of a public meeting; graduating <em>exercises.</em>
  • A spiritual or religious action or effort; an act or procedure of devotion or for spiritual improvement; religious worship, exhortation, or the like.
  • Specifically— Among the Puritans, a church service or week-day sermon: still occasionally used.
  • Family worship. [Scotch.]
  • Formerly, in Scotland, the critical explication of a passage of Scripture, at a meeting of presbytery, by a teaching presbyter, succeeded by a specification of the doctrines contained in it by another, both discourses being judged of, and censured, if necessary, by the rest of the brethren.
  • Formerly, also, the presbytery.
  • A disciplinary spiritual experience or trial; spiritual agitation.
  • To exercise one's self, as under military training; to drill; to take exercise; to use action or exertion; to practice gymnastics.
  • The act of exercising; a setting in action or practicing; employment in the proper mode of activity; exertion; application; use; habitual activity; occupation, in general; practice.
  • Exertion for the sake of training or improvement whether physical, intellectual, or moral; practice to acquire skill, knowledge, virtue, perfectness, grace, etc.
  • Bodily exertion for the sake of keeping the organs and functions in a healthy state; hygienic activity.
  • The performance of an office, a ceremony, or a religious duty.
  • That which is done for the sake of exercising, practicing, training, or promoting skill, health, mental, improvement, moral discipline, etc.; that which is assigned or prescribed for such ends; hence, a disquisition; a lesson; a task
  • That which gives practice; a trial; a test.
  • a deposit of bony matter in the soft tissues, produced by pressure or exertion.
  • To set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to; to put in action habitually or constantly; to school or train; to exert repeatedly; to busy.
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