sequester

Definitions:

  • To remove or set apart; segregate or hide: <i>synonym</i>: <strong> isolate</strong>.
  • To cause to withdraw into seclusion.
  • To remove or isolate (a chemical, often a gas) from an environment by incorporation, mixing, or insertion under pressure.
  • None
  • To take temporary possession of (property) as security against legal claims.
  • To requisition and confiscate (enemy property).
  • To undergo sequestration.
  • The act of sequestering; sequestration; separation; seclusion.
  • In <em>law</em>, a person with whom two or more parties to a suit or controversy deposit the subject of controversy; a mediator or referee between two parties; an umpire.
  • To put aside; remove; separate from other things; seclude; withdraw.
  • In law:
  • To separate from the owner for a time; seize or take possession of, as the property and income of a debtor, until the claims of creditors be satisfied.
  • To set aside from the power of either party, as a matter at issue, by order of a court of law. For use in Scots law, see <internalXref urlencoded="sequestrate">sequestrate</internalXref>. See also <internalXref urlencoded="sequestration">sequestration</internalXref>. Hence To seize for any purpose; confiscate; take possession of; appropriate.
  • To withdraw.
  • In law, to renounce or decline, as a widow any concern with the estate of her husband.
  • To withdraw; to retire.
  • To renounce (as a widow may) any concern with the estate of her husband.
  • To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate.
  • To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration; to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
  • To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from other things.
  • To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude; to withdraw; -- often used reflexively.
  • Sequestration; separation.
  • A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a mediator; an umpire or referee.
  • Same as <er>Sequestrum</er>.
  • To <xref>separate</xref> from all external influence.
  • To separate in order to <xref>store</xref>.
  • To prevent an <xref>ion</xref> in solution from behaving normally by forming a <xref>coordination compound</xref>
  • To temporarily remove (property) from the possession of its owner and hold it as <xref>security</xref> against legal claims.
  • To remove (certain funds) automatically from a budget.
  • To seize and hold <xref>enemy</xref> <xref>property</xref>.
  • <xref>sequestration</xref>; <xref>separation</xref>
  • A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the <xref>controversy</xref>; one who <xref>mediates</xref> between two parties; a <xref>referee</xref>.
  • A <xref>sequestrum</xref>.
  • requisition forcibly, as of enemy property
  • keep away from others
  • undergo sequestration by forming a stable compound with an ion
  • set apart from others
  • take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority
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